Massachusetts Urges Electoral College Reform: Historic Resolution of 1969

Massachusetts Calls for Electoral College Reform: A Historic Resolution from 1969

In 1969, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts made a significant push for electoral reform by passing resolutions urging Congress to amend the United States Constitution. These resolutions aimed to abolish the Electoral College system and establish direct popular election for the President and Vice President of the United States.

The call for reform arose in the aftermath of the 1968 national election, which once again highlighted the flaws and potential deadlock of the Electoral College system. Massachusetts, recognizing the archaic and undemocratic nature of the Electoral College, sought to advocate for a more direct and equitable method of electing the nation's leaders.

The resolutions, adopted by both the Massachusetts Senate and House of Representatives, outlined several key reasons for advocating electoral reform. They emphasized that the Electoral College system failed to fully realize the principle of "one-man, one-vote" in national elections and did not adequately represent the will of the voters.

The resolutions called upon the Congress of the United States to support a constitutional amendment that would abolish the Electoral College system and replace it with direct popular election for the President and Vice President. Copies of these resolutions were promptly transmitted to the presiding officers and members of Congress from Massachusetts.

The resolution passed by Massachusetts in 1969 reflects an early effort to address the shortcomings of the Electoral College system and promote a more democratic electoral process. While the push for electoral reform has continued over the years, with various proposals and debates emerging, the resolution serves as a milestone in the ongoing dialogue surrounding electoral reform in the United States.

The resolutions adopted by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1969 represent a significant moment in the history of electoral reform efforts. As calls for Electoral College reform persist in contemporary discourse, the resolution serves as a reminder of past efforts to enhance the democratic principles upon which the nation was founded.

Original article:

Resolutions of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to Amend the Constitution to Abolish the Electoral College and Establish Direct Popular Election of the President

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/24200387

Record Group 233: Records of the U.S. House of RepresentativesSeries: Committee Papers of the Committee on the JudiciaryFile Unit: Petitions Received by the Committee on the Judiciary during the 91st Congress

[center] The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Office of the Secretary State House, Boston 02133 May 15, 1969 [/center] [left is seal] John F. X. Davoren Secretary of the Commonwealth [right] can't read it M-175 RESOLUTIONS MEMORIALIZING THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES BY PROVIDING FOR THE ABOLITION OF THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE SYSTEM AND ESTABLISHING THE DIRECT POPULAR ELECTION OF THE PRESIDENT AND THE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. [ul] Whereas [/ul], The national election of nineteen hundred and sixty-eight has once again demonstrated the dangerous potentialities for deadlock inherent in the Electoral College system; and [ul] Whereas [/ul], The Electoral College system is archaic, obsolete and undemocratic; and [ul] Whereas [/ul], The Electoral College system does not offer full realization of the one-man, one-vote doctrine in national elections; and [ul] Whereas [/ul], The abolition of the Electoral College system will result in bringing the voters, the ultimate source of all electoral power, directly into the process of electing a President and Vice President of the United States; now, therefore, be it [ul] Resolved [/ul], That the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts respectfully urges the Congress of the United States to support an amendment to the Constitution of the United States which will provide for the abolition of the Electoral College system and its replacement by the direct popular election of the President and Vice President of the United States; and be it further [ul] Resolved [/ul], That copies of these resolutions be transmitted forthwith by the State Secretary to the presiding officer of each branch of Congress and to each member thereof from the Commonwealth. [right] Senate, adopted, April 28, 1969. NORMAN L. PIDGEON, Clerk. House of Representatives, adopted in concurrence, April 30, 1969. WALLACE C. MILLS, Clerk. [left] green seal ----------------- A true copy. Attest: [signature of] John F.X. Davoren JOHN F.X. DAVOREN, Secretary of the Commonwealth.

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